{Science} Intro to Virology College Course

{Science} Intro to Virology College Course

When I was working on my undergrad, my focus was chemistry and biology. Those courses included the standard Biology, Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology, and Biochemistry, but they also included Virology, Immunology, Mycology, and Biology of the Cancer cell. I remember my employer—a private physician and psychiatrist for whom I organized charts, transcribed notes, and did general clerical work while in college—telling me that he was impressed at just how much specialized education I am receiving in my…

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(Home) repurposing a cabinet

(Home) repurposing a cabinet

In November, I found myself with a lot of time on my hands. We have some old entertainment center shelves made of solid oak that I wasn’t fond of, but I love the sturdiness of them. I decided to convert one of them to a wine cabinet, as well as to hold our teacups and cookbooks. The before photo is actually the other shelving unit, but is almost identical and the mirror image. I’d forgotten to take a before photo….

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(Transition to gray) 1/15/2020

(Transition to gray) 1/15/2020

The last time I dyed my hair was just before Thanksgiving. I’ve been feeling uneasy about the chemicals used every month and I finally decided I’m done! After 30ish years of dying my hair, I am done. Here is progress after about 7 weeks of growth

[Colorado History] Fort Collins, CO

[Colorado History] Fort Collins, CO

I have lived in Colorado most of my life.  That means I have lived here for more than 45 years *gasp!*.  When I decided to have a family, I thought I knew just about all there was to know about Colorado.  Then I started home educating my children, and in CO the students are required to learn Colorado history in 4th or 5th grade.  I can tell you as a student in Colorado (Denver Public Schools for 18 years), I…

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[Current Events] The death of critical thinking

[Current Events] The death of critical thinking

To date, I have eliminated Twitter (two years ago) and Facebook (two months ago).  Though I miss seeing “friends,” who quite honestly haven’t tried to contact me off of social media so weren’t really friends, I don’t miss the lack of critical thinking rampant on social media.  Everything is about popularity, being part of the “in” crowd, getting followers and likes, and quite frankly, very high school-ish. There is no such thing as presenting factual material on social media, originally…

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{Art and Performance} 100 Great Paintings

{Art and Performance} 100 Great Paintings

I love the impressionists, and Van Gogh and Monet are my favorites. I also adore DaVinci, but not for his paintings, but rather for his inventions. But I’m not really an “art person.” I don’t have a creative art bone in my body. I have a good eye for photography, and I love photos, but I couldn’t create a drawing or painting to save my life. However, I still believe in the value of art. This month, to study more…

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[Science] Chemistry

[Science] Chemistry

One of our favorite chemistry resources is the channel on YouTube called Periodic Videos. Here’s the supporting website with a clickable periodic table to view the videos: http://www.periodicvideos.com During the pandemic, there has been a new discovery of “black nitrogen”. We all thoroughly enjoyed this new discovery and feeling up to date on research. You can view that video here: Most of all, my children love how exciting he makes chemistry, demonstrating burning and melting points, freezing points, and even…

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[Science] Virology

[Science] Virology

With the panic and propaganda supporting the Covid tyranny, it’s hard to separate fact from fiction. As someone that studied virology, immunology, mycology and microbiology in College, it’s a little easier for me to sort out the noise of the news propaganda. We found a great college course called “Introduction to Virology” from a professor at Columbia University. This is the 2019 lecture series, before the pressure and politics of covid. Watch here: I don’t agree with his position on…

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{History Nibbles} Henry Knox

{History Nibbles} Henry Knox

Henry Knox, better known as General Knox, was born July 25, 1750 in Boston. He was the 7th of 10 children, but 6 of his siblings did not survive to adulthood.  His father couldn’t make a living, so he left his family to work in the West Indies, forcing Henry to end his education at about a 5th grade level.  He worked at the Boston bookbindery to help support his family, and found a way to save money to eventually…

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{Character} Traits of a Statesman: Courage

{Character} Traits of a Statesman: Courage

{Traits of Statesman} Courage is a muscle originally posted April 28, 2012 Just a note, this article was written in early 2011. If you are not familiar with A Thomas Jefferson Education, the Traits of a Statesman are: virtue, wisdom, diplomacy, courage, inspires greatness in others and moves the cause of liberty. “Courage is very important. Like a muscle it is strengthened by use.” ~ Ruth Gordon In recent months, there have been several videos posted on YouTube and showcased…

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